Upcoming Events

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Fall Clean- Up Day

Saturday, October 27, 2018

9:00am-12:30pm

To prepare for the winter months ahead, we will be holding our annual Fall Clean-up Day. We will be wiping down wooden surfaces, taking special care to clean mildewed areas, and waxing the stairs and banisters. Volunteers of all ages are welcome! A light lunch will be provided following the event. 


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The Raymond Farm- Its Architecture, Landscape, and Dream

Lecture by Utsunomiya Maki

Saturday, October 27, 2018

2:30-4:00pm

$15 General , $8 Students

In 1938, with the outbreak of war in Asia, Antonin and Noémi Raymond returned to the United States after eighteen years of practice of architecture and design in Japan.
They purchased a farm in Bucks County, Pennsylvania with the dream to establish a home studio/design atelier— the New Hope Experiment. They renovated and added to the18th Century Quaker farmhouse, executed in the style the Raymonds had synthesized while in Japan — a crafted modern wooden interior within a colonial stone structure.

Raymond’s renovations seem so direct and effortless that one may not notice how challenging it is to create such a simple and compelling work. How did the Raymond’s create such harmony between Japanese and Western proportional systems? How did the Raymonds adjust the design principles and materials they utilized in Japan to accommodate western scaled rooms? Ms. Utsunomiya is studying the structural adjustments and design interventions that Antonin and Noémi made at the Raymond Farm, the spatial and sensual effects they create, and how they reflect Raymonds' philosophy of living in harmony with nature. With her background in horticulture as well as architecture, Ms. Utsunomiya will study and map the farm’s natural vegetation to better understand the intimate relationship between the site, the environment, and the Farmhouse. Please join us as Ms. Utsunomiya shares her findings in her presentation.  

Ms. Maki Utsunomiya received a bachelor's degree in plant physiology at Osaka Prefectural University in 2000, and Ph.D. in human genetic analysis at Kyoto University in 2005. Her interest moved to architecture, and the relationship of architectural space and how it affect lives who dwell within, and became particularly interested in the work of Antonin Raymond and his proteges: Kunio Maekawa, Junzo Yoshimura, and Yoshifumi Nakamura. In 2010 she received her bachelor's in architecture degree from Aichi Sangyo University. Ms. Utsunomiya's work centers on the phenomenal aspects of architecture— the sense of sight, touch, smell, taste, and sound —which links us from inside of our bodies, to the environment surrounding us.

Lecture followed by Q&A and light refreshments


 1931 Corner Desk

1931 Corner Desk

 1947 Three Legged Stool

1947 Three Legged Stool

 1925 Block Print "The Lee Rail"

1925 Block Print "The Lee Rail"

Wharton Esherick: Founder of the American Studio Furniture Movement 

Lecture by Mark Sfirri

**Rescheduled for Saturday, November 10**

2:00-4:00pm

$15 General , $8 Students

Mark Sfirri, an internationally renowned artist, sculptor, teacher and one of the foremost wood turners in the world, has been studying and researching Wharton Esherick since 2006.  Sfirri has authored eighteen articles on history, design, and technique for a variety of craft publications and authored six articles on Esherick for Woodwork and Journal of Modern Craft.  Mark will discuss Esherick's journey from painting, to printmaking, to graphic design, and eventually sculpture and furniture, where he made his biggest mark. 

Wharton Esherick (1887 – 1970) was an internationally significant figure in the landscape of art history and American modern design. As a sculptor, Esherick worked primarily in wood and extended his unique forms to furniture, furnishings, interiors, buildings, and more.  Now recognized as the leader of the Studio Furniture Movement, Esherick saw himself as an artist, not a craftsman, and his concern was with form, not technique. He pursued his artistic vision in forms that might turn to furniture or other sculptural furnishings.

Mark Sfirri studied furniture design at Rhode Island School of Design, where he received both his BFA and MFA while studying under Tage Frid. He is a woodworker who incorporates lathe-turned forms in his furniture and sculpture. His specialty within turning is the use of multiple axes, which has allowed him to create forms that are not readily apparent as turned objects.  Since retired, he ran the Fine Woodworking Program at Bucks County Community College in Newtown, PA for 36 years and received the “Distinguished Educator Award” in 2010 by the Renwick Alliance.  His work is included in the permanent collections of twenty-seven public institutions including the Museum of Art and Design (NYC), The Renwick Gallery (Smithsonian Institutions, Washington DC), The Yale Art Gallery (New Haven, CT), Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Mint Museum of Craft + Design (Charlotte, NC), among others. 

Lecture followed by Q&A and light refreshments

Photos courtesy of Mark Sfirri

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